Sunday September 24 2017     












  Book Archives




    Public Administration
       and Finance


    Human Resources

    New Business Models

    Government Online




  Click here to view our
  archive of articles





   

  Advanced search




  Click here to register
  with Optimum Online





  Click here for our
  extensive link library























Book Review


The Case for Decentralized Federalism

The Case for Decentralized Federalism

by Ruth Hubbard / Gilles Paquet

Federalism is a mode of public governance.

The Case for Decentralized Federalism brings together experts who agree on one key point: decentralized federalism is the optimal arrangement in a diverse and plural context like Canada. Edited by Ruth Hubbard and Gilles Paquet, it presents an articulate and non-ideological case for decentralized federalism, using various alternative lines of argument set out by well-known and respected contributors.

With contributions from Thomas J. Courchene, Ian Peach, Gérard Bélanger, Senator Hugh D. Segal, François Rocher and Marie-Christine Gilbert, Ruth Hubbard and Gilles Paquet, the book proposes ways to cope effectively with Canada’s regional differences, contextual diversity and cultural pluralism through a more decentralized division of the work of public governing among the different levels of government.

Whatever might be the broad objectives pursued (nation-building à la Courchene, effectiveness à la Peach, competition as driver à la Bélanger, subsidiarity à la Segal, a true confederal culture à la Rocher and Gilbert or innovation and open–source social learning à la Hubbard & Paquet), decentralized federalism is the most promising arrangement.

For the case against decentralization—condemning the lack of assertiveness of the federal government—look for The Case for Centralized Federalism edited by Gordon DiGiacomo and Maryantonett Flumian, also published by the University of Ottawa Press.

Ruth Hubbard, a former federal deputy minister, is senior fellow at the Centre on Governance at the University of Ottawa. She is the author of Profession: Public Servant (Invenire Books, 2009).

Gilles Paquet is professor emeritus and senior research fellow at the Centre on Governance at the University of Ottawa. He has authored or edited 40 books, including The New Geo-Governance (University of Ottawa Press, 2005).

Table of Contents

Foreword

Introduction

Federalism as a Philosophy of Governance
Ruth Hubbard and Gilles Paquet

Part I

The Positive Case

Chapter 1

Federalism, Decentralization and Canadian Nation Building
Thomas J. Courchene

Chapter 2

The Practical Defence of Decentralization
Ian Peach

Chapter 3

The Theoretical Defence of Decentralization
Gérard Bélanger

Part II

The Normative Case

Chapter 4

Beyond Centralization: How to Liberate Federalism?
Hugh Segal

Chapter 5

Re-Federalizing Canada:
Refocusing the Debate on Decentralization
François Rocher and Marie Christine Gilbert

Chapter 6

Toward an Autopoietic Federalism
Ruth Hubbard and Gilles Paquet

Conclusion

Decentralized Federalism as a Baroque Experiment
Ruth Hubbard and Gilles Paquet



The Case for Decentralized FederalismThe Case for Centralized Federalism

   par Gordon DiGiacomo / Maryantonett Flumian

The Case for Centralized Federalism goes against the current prevailing opinion on federal-provincial relations, which consistently supports reducing the federal government’s powers. Edited by Gordon DiGiacomo and Maryantonett Flumian, this book argues that the federal government is best placed to respond to issues of national interest and create effective policy.

With contributions from Gordon DiGiacomo, Michael D. Behiels, Brooke Jeffrey, Cheryl N. Collier, Maryantonett Flumian and Inger Weibust, the book analyzes the federal government’s recent deferential approach to intergovernmental relations and condemns their submissiveness.  They locate the origin of this approach in the ambivalent attitudes of the country’s founders and in short-sighted electoral objectives. They show how it has hampered federal politics and administration, creating a federal government both unwilling and unable to assume leadership.

For the case against centralization, look for The Case for Decentralized Federalism edited by Ruth Hubbard and Gilles Paquet, also published by the University of Ottawa Press.

Gordon DiGiacomo is a public policy research consultant and a sessional lecturer of political science at Carleton University. He is the author of a number of articles in learned journals.

Maryantonett Flumian is president of the Institute on Governance and a seasoned senior executive in the Canadian federal public service with more than 20 years of experience in economic, social and federal/provincial domains.

Table of Contents

Foreword

Introduction

Gordon DiGiacomo
Maryantonett Flumian

Chapter 1

Ottawa's Deferential Approach to Intergovernmental Relations
Gordon DiGiacomo

Chapter 2

Asymmetrical Federalism in Canada: Magic Wand or Breaking
Breaking the Ties that Bind?
Michael Behiels

Chapter 3

Stephen Harper’s Open Federalism: Promoting a Neo-liberal Agenda?
Brooke Jeffrey

Chapter 4

Is Canada Ready for a New Universal Social Program? Comparing the Cases of Universal Medicare in the 1960s and "Universal" Child Care in the New Millennium
Cheryl Collier

Chapter 5

The Practitioner’s Perspective: Canada is a Journey, Not a Destination
Maryantonett Flumian

Chapter 6

The Great Green North? Canada’s Bad Environmental Record and How the Feds Can Fix It
Inger Weibust

Conclusion

The Federal Government is Not Simply One Government Among Many
Gordon DiGiacomo









Home | About Optimum Online | Privacy & Cookies | Site Credits |  



Copyright © 2008-2017 Optimum Online